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Nov 7

Metropolitan Museum of Art – Degas and Impressionism Livestream Program

November 7 @ 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm EST

Metropolitan Museum of Art – Degas and Impressionism Livestream Program. Hosted by Robert Kelleman – Washington, DC History & Culture.

Let’s travel to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to see the beautiful paintings, drawings and sculptures of Edgar Degas. The Met has the best Impressionist art collection outside of France (second only to the Musée d’Orsay in Paris) – and they have numerous works by Edgar Degas. We’ll learn about the life and career of Degas through the Met’s amazing art collection. Our online/virtual program will show how the paintings, drawings and sculptures by Degas in New York relate to some of his well-known works at other museums. We’ll also compare and contrast his art with several other Impressionists at the Metropolitan Museum of Art including Claude Monet, Mary Cassatt, Edouard Manet, Pierre-August Renoir, Berthe Morison, Paul Cezanne, Vincent Van Gogh and many more!

Edgar Degas (19 July 1834 – 27 September 1917) was a French Impressionist artist famous for his pastel drawings and oil paintings.

Degas also produced bronze sculptures, prints and drawings. Degas is especially identified with the subject of dance; more than half of his works depict dancers. Although Degas is regarded as one of the founders of Impressionism, he rejected the term, preferring to be called a realist, and did not paint outdoors as many Impressionists did.

Degas was a superb draftsman, and particularly masterly in depicting movement, as can be seen in his rendition of dancers and bathing female nudes. In addition to ballet dancers and bathing women, Degas painted racehorses and racing jockeys, as well as portraits. His portraits are notable for their psychological complexity and for their portrayal of human isolation.

At the beginning of his career Degas wanted to be a history painter, a calling for which he was well prepared by his rigorous academic training and close study of classical art. In his early thirties he changed course, and by bringing the traditional methods of a history painter to bear on contemporary subject matter, he became a classical painter of modern life.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art of New York City, colloquially “the Met”, is the largest art museum in the United States. Its permanent collection contains over two million works. The main building at 1000 Fifth Avenue, along the Museum Mile on the eastern edge of Central Park in Manhattan’s Upper East Side, is by area one of the world’s largest art galleries. A much smaller second location, The Cloisters at Fort Tryon Park in Upper Manhattan, contains an extensive collection of art, architecture, and artifacts from medieval Europe.

The museum’s permanent collection consists of works of art from classical antiquity and ancient Egypt, paintings, and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanian, Byzantine, and Islamic art. The museum is home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes, and accessories, as well as antique weapons and armor from around the world. Several notable interiors, ranging from 1st-century Rome through modern American design, are installed in its galleries.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 to bring art and art education to the American people and is one of the most-visited art museums in the world.

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Your host for this program is Robert Kelleman, the founder/director of the non-profit community organization Washington, DC History & Culture.

Donations Support Our Non-Profit Community Programs – Thank You!

PayPal: DCHistoryAndCulture@gmail.com

Venmo: @DCHistoryAndCulture

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Zoom Connection:

This educational and entertaining program is open to all regardless of age, geographic location, etc. and since it is an online/virtual event via Zoom you can connect from anywhere in the world.

Zoom events have a limit on the number of people that can participate and therefore the event may “sell-out” once a certain number of registrations has been reached.

Zoom Connection Link Will Be Emailed:

Login info will emailed several times beginning 24 hours prior to the event.

If you haven’t received the Zoom connection 8 hours before the event please contact us.

Zoom Connection Suggestions:

Connecting a few minutes early is strongly recommended.

To join the event simply click the Zoom link and follow the instructions.

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This program is presented by the non-profit community organization Washington, DC History & Culture: experience the history and culture of Washington, DC – and the world!

For more entertaining and educational programs visit us at:

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https://www.Facebook.com/DCHistoryAndCulture

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We look forward to seeing you – thanks!

Robert Kelleman

rkelleman@yahoo.com

202-821-6325 (text only)

History & Culture Travels / Washington, DC History & Culture

For complete details: Click Here

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